The term special needs is a catch-all phrase which can refer to a vast array of diagnoses and/or disabilities. Children with special needs may have been born with a syndrome, terminal illness, profound cognitive impairment, or serious psychiatric problems. Other children may have special needs that involve struggling with learning disabilities, food allergies, developmental delays, or panic attacks. The designation “children with special needs” is for children who may have challenges which are more severe than the typical child, and could possibly last a lifetime. These children will need extra support, and additional services. They will have distinct goals, and will need added guidance and help meeting academic, social, emotional, and sometimes medical milestones. Persons with special needs may need lifetime guidance and support while dealing with everyday issues such as housing, employment, social involvement, and finances. For children with special needs, early intervention[i] is an important step towards helping the child fulfill his or her full academic, emotional, and social potential. Early intervention refers to a process during which the developmental abilities of the child are evaluated. If necessary, a program is developed that contain services (individualized on the basis of the child’s specific needs) that will help to further enhance the child’s developmental skills and encourage developmental growth.